Cartographica Neerlandica Map Text for Ortelius Map No. 46


Text, scholarly version, translated from the 1579/1580Latin 2nd Add, 1579 Latin (AB), 1580/1589 German, 1584 Latin, 1588 Spanish, 1592 Latin, 1595 Latin, 1601 Latin, 1602 German, 1602 Spanish, 1603 Latin, 1606 English, 1608/1612 Italian, 1609/1612 Latin and 1609/1612/1641 Spanish edition:

46.1. {1579/1580L2Add{PICARDIE.

46.2. The name of Picardie is not ancient, as stated by all who write about France, and none of them can present its origins or derivation. Cúnalis does not venture to say that it got its name from the Begardes. Belleforest flatly denies it, supposing [as he does] that the Picardes are more ancient than the Begardes. Some think they were named as they are after the warlike weapon commonly called the pike, which, as they imagine, was first invented here. It is certain that the province of Picardie was larger in former times [than it is now]. For we read that Artois, and a part of Flanders as far as the river Lis, [as well as] the county of Boulogne were all included under the name of Picardia. The region which is now properly called Picardia does not extend so far, as you can see on the map.
46.3. This region is part of Gallica Belgica, once inhabited by those from Amiens, Beauvais and Vermandois or, as Ptolemśus calls them, Romandui. The river Somme which some think to be Ptolemśus' Phrudis, refreshes the whole country, and renders it fertile for all kinds of grain, {not in 1580/1589G & 1602G{and the towns and cities too abound with all necessities}not in 1580/1589G & 1602G}, for it yields so much wheat that it is called by a common saying the barn or granary of Paris. It has no vineyards, which defect some think is to be attributed to the laziness of the inhabitants, rather than to the inappropriateness of either the soil or the climate.
46.4. The cities here of prime importance are Amiens, {not in 1608/1612I{in Latin Ambianum}not in 1608/1612I}, famous both for [its] antiquity and its episcopal see. It is surrounded by the river Somme, for which reason some think it was named Ambianum, ab ambitu aquarum [from the surrounding of waters] because it is surrounded by waters. It is one of the strongest towns in all of France. The common people think it to have been built by the soldiers of Alexander the Great. This diocese includes Abbeville, which is a new name, as becomes clear from its derivation, which in Latin is Abbatis villa, that is the abbots town, for out of an abbey it increased in size to the greatness and shape of a city. It is now the main city of the county [of] Ponthieu, which region is so called a multitudine pontium, [after its multitude of bridges], because it is in many places infested by marshes and fens {1580/1589G, 1588S, 1602S, 1608/1612I & 1609/1612/1641S only{of the sort that you cannot easily walk there}1580/1589G, 1588S, 1602S, 1608/1612I & 1609/1612/1641S only}.
46.5. Picquigny is also to be found in this province, built if we are to believe popular folklore by a certain Pignon, a soldier of Alexander the Great. Also in Vermandois you have the church of St. Quintin which many people suppose to have been Augusta Veromanduorum, the ancient seat of the dukes of Vermandois, and the chief [city] of that region. Who does not know about Peronne, so often spoilt in wars? Guise also seems to be a stronghold against Luxemburg. From this the Guisian family derives its name. Other cities of less importance [there are], such as Corbeil, Roye, Nesles, Han, Castelette, Montdidier &c.
46.6. In a little French pamphlet called Chemins de France, or the roads of France, Picardie is divided into three parts: the lower, the higher and the true or proper Picardie, in which are contained the regions of Vermandois, Retelois, Tartenois and Tirasse which is much easier to use than by making up new Latin/German/Spanish names {1580/1589G & 1602G have instead{I prefer to mention these names in their native tongue, rather than make German names for them, for these places have also been entered in this map of ours with their proper names}1580/1589G & 1602G instead, which end here}. Picardia proper, as it is called, is depicted in this map of ours as well}1579/1580L2Add, 1579L(AB), 1584L, 1588S, 1592L, 1595L, 1601L, 1602S, 1603L, 1606E & 1609/1612/1641S end here}{1608/1612I only{but not the other parts mentioned above}1608/1612I only which ends here}.

Now follows the vernacular text version, translated from the 1581 French, 1587 French, 1598 French and 1598/1610/1613 Dutch editions.

46.7. {1581F{PICARDIE.

46.8. The name of Picardia is not ancient, as stated by all who write about France, and none of them can present the origins or derivation of this name. Cúnalis does not venture to say that it got its name from the Begardes. Belleforest flatly denies it, supposing [as he does] that the Picardes are more ancient than the Begardes. Some think they were named as they are after the warlike weapon called the pikes, which, as they imagine, was first invented here. It is certain that the province of Picardie was larger in former times [than it is now]. For we read that Artois, and a part of Flanders as far as the river Lis, [as well as] the county of Boulogne were all included under the name of Picardie. The region which is now properly called Picardie does not extend so far, as you can see on the map.
46.9. This region is part of Gallica Belgica, once inhabited by those from Amiens, Beauvais and Vermandois {not in 1598/1610/1613D{(or, as Ptolemśus calls them, Romandui}not in 1598/1610/1613D}. The river Somme which some think to be Ptolemśus' Phrudis, refreshes the whole country, and renders it fertile for all kinds of grain, and the towns and cities too abound with all necessities, for it yields so much wheat that it is called by a common saying the barn or granary of Paris. It has no vineyards, which defect some think is to be attributed to the laziness of the inhabitants, rather than to the inappropriateness of either the soil or the climate.
46.10. The cities here in Picardie of prime importance are Amiens, famous both for [its] antiquity and its episcopal see. It is surrounded by the river Somme, for which reason some fondly think it was named Ambianum, ab ambitu aquarum [from the surrounding of waters]. It is one of the strongest towns in all of France. The common people think it to have been built by the soldiers of Alexander the Great. The diocese of Amiens includes Abbeville, which is a new name, as becomes clear from its derivation, for Abbeville just means city or village of the abbey, for out of an abbey it increased in size to the greatness and shape of a city. It is now the main city of the county [of] Ponthieu, which region is so called a multitudine pontium, [after its multitude of bridges], because it is in many places infested by marshes and fens of the sort that you cannot go there without bridges.
46.11. Picquignie is also to be found in this province, built, if we are to believe folk tales, by a certain Pignon, a soldier of Alexander the Great. Also in Vermandois you have the town of St. Quintin close by, which many people suppose to have been Augusta Veromanduorum, the ancient seat of the dukes of Vermandois, and the chief [city] of that region. Who does not know about Peronne, so often spoilt in wars? Guise also seems to be a stronghold against Luxemburg. From this the Guisian family derives its name. Other cities of less importance [there are], such as Corbeil, Roye, Nelle, Han, Castelette, Montdidier &c.
46.12. In a little French pamphlet called Chemins de France, [the roads of France], Picardie is divided into three parts: the lower, the higher and true Picardie or Picardie proper, in which are contained the regions of Vermandois, Retelois, Tartenois and Tirasse. Picardia proper, as it is called, is depicted in this map of ours as well}1581F, 1587F, 1598F & 1598/1610/1613D end here.}.

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